Tag Archives: Windows 10

Too many Firefoxes

Many of us remember the famous Windows XP Service Pack 2, which really marked when Microsoft started to get serious about their client systems’ security. Prior to that there was little to guide the end user that I remember. XPSP2 brought the first version of the Security Center, which made it easy to set up the Windows Firewall and actually told them they they needed an antivirus to be safe. This was still prior to Microsoft’s providing one.

Anyway, Windows Firewall is still around and rarely seen after maybe the first week of an installation of Windows, since it is on by default and by then, all the other programs will have been installed and configured to go through the firewall.

Sometimes, however, things glitch:

Firewall-toomanyffx

Three entries for Firefox in Windows Firewall.

I have no idea what the cause of this is. Is it a problem?

An unwontedly ugly property sheet

We all know that parts of a system that are used the least are generally the worst. They get the least attention and have the lowest priority when triaging bugs. In some cases they are so rarely seen that they don’t even get bug reports written about them. Vide the now notorious Windows 3.x font addition dialog that lasted until Windows Vista.

Here is a less egregious example from Windows 10 (current version, 1511):

UglyFTPProps

Note the background color problem under the permissions section of the dialog. I suspect that it has been there since Windows 98 or something. If it was removed, this would look fine. Maybe in the next version of Windows, the anniversary update, they will improve this?

I am not mentioning the UNIX style permissions because that is a function of the FTP server, rather than the Windows FTP client.

Hypermarking by a Microsoft coder

I’ve noticed something about industrial/intellectual property marking: the bigger or more established the company or undertaking, the more understated the marking. For example, Mozilla Firefox’s about box (The traditional place for dropping IP notices) just has a small type note that “Firefox and the Firefox logos are trademarks of the Mozilla Foundation”.

In contrast, small time operators usually go overboard with the ©®™ stuff. I have decided to call this “hypermarking”. The thought of the thesis above came from my observing an example of it in, of all places, Microsoft Windows.

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Missing cancel option

In Windows 10, there is an option (well hidden) to require people to press Ctrl+Alt+Delete before they sign in to Windows. The technical reasons WikipediA explains here why this is a thing.

Anyway, in all previous versions of Windows, after giving it the three-fingered salute you could cancel out by clicking a back button, a cancel button, or hitting the Esc key.

Windows 10 for some reason eliminated these, so you can’t jump back to the lock screen, but have to either sign back in, or wait 120 seconds for the system to kick you back to the lock screen.

Does anyone know why this was done? Is there some security or usability benefit to this new behavior?

Office integration in File History

At the risk of posting so many Microsoft Windows-related posts that I’m accused of being a fanboy, I will share this discovery I made today.

In Windows 10, Office 2013 integrates into File History (the sometimes confused default backup tool in Windows 8 and Windows 10) so you can view your backed up files without having to restore them.

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How to get rid of the Bluetooth icon from the Action Center in Windows 10

EDIT (August 5, 2016): This post is now obsolete: the “Anniversary update” or version 1607 allows you to individually enable and disable the quick actions, including Bluetooth. Worth noting: Windows now does not even allow the icon on my PC, perhaps recognizing that it is not even present.

EDIT (June 16, 2016): It’s gone again, because I installed the latest cumulative update for Windows 10. Will keep observing.

EDIT (May 8, 2016): This no longer works for me.

In Windows 10, the Action Center contains some “quick action” tiles at the bottom of its flyout panel. One of the common ones is Bluetooth, even if the PC doesn’t support it. This is evidently frustrating to many people.

I found what I think is the answer:

  1. Restart Windows

I know it’s an old joke about Windows that you restart it to get it to work, but I’ve noticed that the unwanted icon shows up whenever I’ve installed a cumulative update from Windows Update… and disappears at the first restart afterwards.

Try it and let me know of your success.

What is that supposed to look like? VPN edition

In Windows 10, the Action Center is a flyout panel with information and common (supposedly) actions that you get by clicking the little message icon in the notification area at the lower right of your screen (lower left if you have an RTL language). A sales-language infused explanation is here on Microsoft’s site for Windows (10).

Down in the lower part of the flyout is a collection of “quick actions” – buttons you can hit to bring up common tools like PC Settings and OneNote. One of the common actions is VPN. Evidently Microsoft is expecting them to become a big thing, but my question is:

VPN-icon

What is that swirly icon supposed to be? It looks sortof like the Command key on a Macintosh, or maybe this flag from New Zealand. Nothing about it says “virtual private network” to me, nor would I guess that’s what it meant if it was spotted alone in the user interface somewhere.