Tag Archives: inexobs

The Commies are coming?

I was born far too late to have lived through either of the “Red scares”, but that doesn’t mean their detritus isn’t available for me to find. Here is one example:

COmmies

The publisher of this one is far from “lost”: The American Bar Association is still around, probably as strong as ever. Their “Standing Committee on Education against Communism”, however, appears to no longer exist.

Do note the “bar” in the ABA’s logo, though.

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Entertaining company names

The origin of the “InExObs” (inexplicable objects) I sometimes blog about had a running series called “Who named the business?” (part 1) where the author would comment on unusual (usually stupid sounding) business names.

Here are two that I’ve patronized, though I don’t think they are stupid, but entertaining:

  • Exuberant software – A dude’s effort to make a “Service Pack” for Windows 98’s seeming myriad patches. No longer updated or very useful, it was a useful tool back in the darker days of Windows 9x. Still the name, which means highly enthusiastic, was memorable in its own right.

  • Resplendence software – A site of Windows utilities. I do recall thinking at the time that the name, which means displaying exceptional beauty, was odd for programs with not so hot user interfaces. Hopefully they’ve gotten better at that.

Animal croquet from China in the maybe 70s

More consumer product archaeology. Found this in a display case at my grand mothers old house:

AnimalCroquetI’m guessing this is pre-1973 and the “China” refers to what we now call Taiwan. The character for “State” is written in traditional Chineze1, so I don’t think it is “mainland” Chineze.

All this aside, it is a little strange and somewhat freaky. It cost 1.50 USD according to the price tag on the back of the box. Note the strange, possibly custom, font for “Croquet”.


  1. A further post to follow on spelling Chineze “incorrectly”. 

The danger of yo momma’s Science

Going through the workshop I discovered a t0n of old pesticides. Fortunately I didn’t see any DDT, but I did find things like diazanon (off the market since 1994), chloridane (sometime in the 1980s), nasty sounding other cyano stuff and other matters, including unlabeled (!) bottles and a bottle that didn’t list its ingredients, but assured you it was “a product of Science” (those exact words)! While fearful of the contents, I do admire those days when science was more trusted than it is now. On the other side, blind trust in science lead to some disasters I’d definitely not want to see repeated. Also found were old bottles of really concentrated lye drain cleaner and various solvents that shouldn’t be exposed to persons nowadays.

Additionally, there was some old educational matter, vocabulary worksheets from The Economy Company. The sentences were things like:

  • We all own the White House, we just let the president live there.
  • Mr. Manly is the second most patient teacher, yours is the first.
  • Or you could marry a princess.
  • Hamburger-scented perfume would be a sure success.

The moral of the story is, be sure to check out your and your parents’ stores of chemicals periodically and especially if they have been sitting around unused for a while. Some may be unusable now and others have a way of leaking their containers.