Author Archives: FlowCoef

About FlowCoef

A hopefully entertaining blogger, frequently of technical things, but some artistic commentary too.

The POWRfull slide-rule

This has been sitting in my place, and then scanned to a PDF, but I have to post it here before it gets lost in a fire or I die or something: POWRfull

It is a slide rule for metricating, or going backwards too. Far more than anything else for the purpose, it is a classical “New Jersey style” tool that does one thing, well. Here are immages:

POWRfull

Two sides of the slide rule for converting units between US Customary and metric. The unit pairs are, upper top row: (inches, centimeters); (meters, feet); (meters, yards); (miles, kilometers). Lower top row: (sq. inches, sq. centimeters); (sq. meters, sq. feet × 10); (sq. meters, sq. yards); (sq. miles, sq. kilometers). Upper bottom row: (cu. inches, cu. centimeters × 10); (cu. meters, cu. feet × 10); (cu. meters, cu. yards); (liters, quarts). Lower bottom row: (ounces, grams × 10); (kilograms, pounds); (metric tons, short tons); (gallons, liters).

Other than being made by Sterling in the United States, and of course being in the ISRM about two-thirds of the way down this page, it is perfect. It will live again, especially when I find out how to vectorize it or make Excel use it.

 

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A C-suite idea to improve society

In American English, the “C-suite” refers to all the various head positions at a firm, named because they all have “Chief” in their tituls. The most notorious by far is CEO, or “Chief Executive Officer”, who runs all of the other C-suite inhabitants. There are others, as CPO (privacy), COO (operating), CFO (finantial), CIO (information), and what ever other tituls the organization wants.

I am going to propose something that will add another “CCO” to the Wikipedian list already compiled: Chief Calmness Officer.

We are almost all familiar with the hair trigger of societal media going off half cocked1 on partial information, sometimes maliciously cooked up, often not.

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Report of the Wheel-Barrow Man

I knew in a slight way, a few years ago, an older man who lived alone on the outskirts of a village, further than I did. He lived alone and walked almost everywhere. When traveling to the store in the village to pick up groceries, he used a wheel barrow on the shoulder of the State road there and back. I called him “Wheelbarrow Man” once when my grand mother was around she didn’t like it, correcting me with his real name and title.

After he died, his sister, who I knew independently, let me have some of his things, including a typescript proposal. Having used a scanner and Microsoft Word to digitize it, I set it out below

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Question for the score writers

My nearest neighbors (common wall) have taken to listening to “true crime”/forensic detection shows at this time of night. I heard about someone named Bunchi (?) who was murdered by her husband in Missouri (?).

My question for persons who score these productions: how does one come up with incidental music/sounds that, without words or identifiable sounds, immediately identify the show as a crime documentary?